Mongolian Style Hot Pot

Have you ever tried eating a Mongolian hot pot? It’s something simple you can do at home or at a restaurant.

All you need is a mobile electric or propane gas stove, a pot, broth and a variety of food. For this particular occasion, we went to a restaurant that had a stove that was built into the table. The broths for hot pot can be spicy or sweet. We got the “yin yang” version, which has a divider in the middle of the pot so that you can have two broths simultaneously. However, when we do this at home, we like to have a satay flavoured broth and a simple chicken broth.

From there, you have a bunch of dishes that are raw/uncooked. When the broth boils, you can start adding a few items into the pot to cook. Items range from all sorts of thinly sliced meats, vegetables and seafood. The world is your oyster….and you can add oysters too. ๐Ÿ˜‰ You can also cook noodles, Asian meatballs, dumplings, tofu and fungi. I wish I got a better photo of the variety of food that we had, but this was the best I could do. You can also have multiple dipping sauces on the side, like soy sauce, sesame oil, chili, etc. to enhance our cooked items.

When the food is done, you use a strainer to scoop the food out and then add more food into the pot. This restaurant only gave two communal strainers, but at home we like to have enough so that everyone has their own. Just remember which utensils you used to touch the raw foods. You don’t want to use those for eating! And if you find your broth is starting to get low, just add some water or chicken stock to it and continue cooking.

To me, the purpose of hot pot is to have an intimate social or family gathering. While you can technically just dump everything into one pot, boil and serve, hot pot is a meal that takes time because you gradually plop several items in periodically. The whole process is meant to be very gradual and relaxing. It’s also good for those who get a little fidgety just sitting around a dinner table. For me, the best part about hot pot is saving the noodles for last. By then, the broth is so rich in flavour that adding soup to it makes it so tasty! Have you ever tried a hot pot?

Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot

Various locations in the U.S.A, Canada, China and Japan

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