Pomelo Peel Stew

You know how I’m a strong proponent for not wasting anything when it comes to food? Usually I am referring to offal, but how about the skins of a fruit? Some use the zest of citrus fruits for baking and cooking or even turning them into dried goods or candies, but have you ever consumed fruit peels as a meal?

Back when it was Lunar New Year, we had a huge pomelo. The Chinese word for pomelo is a homophone for “blessing”, which is why it appears in many households during that time (it also just happens to be a winter fruit). Unfortunately, I don’t have a picture of this year’s glory, but I do have pictures of the pomelo peel dish. It was the first time I ever ate pomelo skins and it was an interesting experience. My mother prepared this dish for us and she said because the pomelo was so nice this year, she felt it would have been a waste to dump the skins. I couldn’t agree more.

Pomelo_skins_edible
Pomelo skins – Edible?

The secret to making this dish is using a pomelo with a nice and thick, blemish-free skin. Once the skins have been peeled and washed, they need to soak in a large bowl of water for several days to remove the bitterness (changing the water every so often). Since the fruit peels are buoyant, it helps to add heavy plates on top to ensure that they are fully submerged in the water during the soaking period.

A piece of pomelo skin
A piece of pomelo skin

Although there are different ways to cook this, this version was prepared with miso paste, oyster sauce, sugar, and a bit of chicken seasoning powder. It’s stewed for a period of time so that the peels become soft. Apparently it’s common to have these served with shrimp eggs in Hong Kong, but that’s difficult to find around these parts so it was omitted.

So what’s it like to eat pomelo peels? They seemed to mimic the texture of a super spongy meat, but had the benefit of being able to heavily absorb the sauce. It was somewhat similar to pig rinds and was squishy, but it was definitely meat free (the chicken seasoning can be omitted if youre vegetarian). It supposedly has lots of fiber, which is an added bonus. Have you ever tried pomelo skins before?

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35 Comments Add yours

  1. jyo says:

    This is totally new to me….sounds really interesting πŸ’―

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      I’m happy to find new things and share with others. Thanks for the compliment Jyo! πŸ™‚

      Like

    2. Rini says:

      I’m happy to find new things and share with others. Thanks for the compliment Jyo!

      Like

  2. Megala says:

    Interesting soup ! Never seen pomelo fruit before !!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Thanks Megala. It’s kind of strange, but it’s a thing. Lol πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve never heard of this fruit before, I’ll have to see if I can find it πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      I’m amazed at the number of fruits in the world that we don’t even get here. I can only wonder what I’ll find (and try) next. Thanks for stopping by! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I’ve never had savory pomelo rinds, but this sounds so good!
    I used to make candied pomelo rinds, which are so delicious. However, lately I can only find the red pomelos, with much thinner skin, so it makes it impossible to use them for cooking. I’m still always hoping to find the larger pomemols…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Thanks Ronit! Those candied ones sound good. Have you ever posted a recipe about them? I’d love to try making them one day, although I may have the opposite problem. I don’t think I have ever seen red pomelos around these parts!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I only posted the recipe years ago in an Israeli magazine, where the photos were done by a professional photographer, so I can’t use them. I”m still hoping to find thick skinned pomelo so I’d be able to upload the recipe and share this amazing sweet. Your post gave me the idea to look for it in an Asian market, so thank you for that! πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Rini says:

        Oh wow. Congrats on your publication! It’s not a surprise to me though. Your recipes are always drool-worthy and informative. Kudos to you, Ronit! I look forward to the day you can post that pomelo recipe. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thank you Rini. This publication is one of many, as I’ve been a food journalist in Israel for many years and also published a cookbook there.
        I doubt I’ll be able to post the recipe any time soon, however, if interested, send me your email and I’ll send you the translated recipe for you to try.
        I can be reached at pensoron@gmail.com

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Rini says:

        That would be great Ronit. I’ll send you an email shortly. Thanks! πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Just answered. Hope you’ll find it interesting. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Rini says:

        Excellent. I shall take a looksie. Thanks Ronit!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I love that you use most of all parts of food! This looks very good!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Thanks Diane!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. cookingflip says:

    What I have here are two jars [already] of dried orange and satsuma peels. I don’t know why I’m doing it, but just assuming there’s a recipe for them somewhere. Any suggestion?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      I typically think of baking when I first think of using peels, but I found an article that might give you some inspiration: http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/0/20416897 Meat dishes, curries, sauces, bread, cookies, cakes, smoothies, tea…you can probably add it to almost anything. I know you enjoy improvisation when you cook, so perhaps you could incorporate the peels into some of the dishes you already make to give it a citrusy touch. I’d just suggest giving the peels a good wash beforehand to get rid of any pesticides first (which I’m hoping you did before you dried the ones you have). If not, perhaps potpourri? πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. cookingflip says:

        Thanks so much, Rini for the ideas and the link πŸ™‚ I think I actually started doing this because a Chinese blogger was drying her citrus peels (she was skewering them in a wire and then air-drying them), but she stopped posting in her blog so I didn’t know what happened next! Yes, yes, I’ve washed the peels, and they’re unwaxed πŸ™‚ Potpourri–that also crossed my mind, but the scent they’re exuding isn’t that very strong (except for the brief instance after the jar is opened)–but how I miss having time to do crafting! Cheers! x

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Rini says:

        They stopped blogging? I hate when that happens, especially when they have such interesting posts! It’s like a suspense movie and you have to wait for part two. Lol Pleasure’s all mine. If I have more ideas, I’ll let you know. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      3. cookingflip says:

        Thanks, Rini–already, I threw in some dried peels into my fish stew (amazing!) πŸ™‚ , but wasn’t able to take a pic as I scoffed down my food before rushing to work, lol.
        (The blog link is still in my list–I’m hoping she’d still resurrect it someday!)

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Rini says:

        #Foodieproblems. Lol

        Liked by 1 person

  7. cookingflip says:

    I swallowed while reading your post, btw πŸ˜‹ Next time I get hold of pomelos (back home, I don’t find it here), I’ll save the peels. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Thanks cookingflip! Appreciate the comment. Don’t forget to take and share pictures! Speaking of home, I have to go to the Philippines to try non-artificial calamansi! All I have right now is Tang….although people have told me I can get them around here…I’d just have to pay a pretty penny for it!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. cookingflip says:

        I will if I get hold of a pomelo (we used to have a tree, but it has already been cut down many years ago). Calamansi!!!! 3-4 squeezed calamansi to a medium glass of water, plus a tbsp of white/semi-brown sugar–it’s a real treat! (Or squeeze over noodles πŸ˜‹ ) You will feel at home in the PH–we have a big Fil-Chi community. In my personal periphery they were my classmates, teachers, colleagues, friends, our donors. x (My connecting flight last time was Beijing–next time I’d make sure to do my research and get a visa!)

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Rini says:

        Ooh I think you blogged about that tree before or mentioned it. I bet it’s refreshing to add calamansi to those things. Thanks for the share. I just have to remember! Lol

        Liked by 1 person

      3. cookingflip says:

        That was the neighbour’s cacao tree, lol. We also had a calamansi bush, but last time I visited my Mum said it died (after 26 years). Anyway, you have a good day. Cheers! πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Rini says:

        Ah, I need more omegas. Lol Have an enjoyable weekend!

        Liked by 1 person

      5. cookingflip says:

        Thanks 😊🎠🎑🎒

        Liked by 1 person

  8. kikicoe says:

    Never seen Pomelo before! Really want to try it now, look super good x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Thanks Kikicoe! Isn’t it amazing how there are so many different fruits are out there? πŸ™‚

      Like

  9. InspiresN says:

    Thanks for the introduction to this new peel. Usually most of the vitamins and good stuff are mostly in the peels for so many fruits and veggies!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Yes, it’s a shame many tend to throw them out as undesirable but I think things are changing. Thanks for stopping by. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

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