Asian Fish Markets and Trying Sea Urchin

You know what I find fascinating? Other than finding food and learning about different cultures, it’s where my readers are from. It’s especially intriguing when I discover someone reading my blog from a place I’ve never even heard of. It only makes me want to discover more about that country (and, of course, the food). However, let’s talk a bit about an Asian discovery today. πŸ™‚

Beach

The first time I walked into a Seafood Market in Asia (South Korea, to be accurate), I was astounded by the number of seafood options that were available.

Asian Fish Market
Asian Fish Market

There were tanks everywhere with all types of fish, shellfish, and unidentifiable moving objects floating or crawling around in water. I won’t lie, it was a bit troublesome to think I could have been swimming in water with these different animals! Granted, a majority of them are probably much deeper in the ocean, but you never know!

Horseshoe Crab
Horseshoe Crab…in case you were wondering πŸ™‚

Cuttlefish

Anyway, I bring this up because I remember when I went to Hong Kong, we went to a beach and my uncle put on his snorkel gear and started diving under water. At first, I thought he only did that to get a closer look at the sea creatures below.

The beach
The beach

The water was so clear, you could see the sand and tadpoles swimming near shore.

Tadpoles near the shore
Tadpoles near the shore

However, to my surprise, he came back with some goodies – fresh sea urchins. These spiky creatures are considered a delicacy in many cultures. Plus, it’s really expensive to order in restaurants so to get them fresh out of the water, even better. πŸ™‚

Fresh Sea Urchins
Fresh Sea Urchins

They have the hard spikes on the outside, so you have to crack them open to get into the insides. Although it doesn’t look appetizing, I tried it anyway. As they say, do as the locals do.

The creamy insides of a fresh sea urchin
The creamy insides of a fresh sea urchin

Down the hatchet! It was rich, smooth, and creamy, though the flavour wasn’t very pungent. It didn’t take fishy, but slightly briny and sweet. It was almost custard-like. I’m sure, like a lot of weird things that I have tried over the years, sea urchin may not be for everyone. However, if you come across it, I’d say give it a whirl…especially if you can find someone that can catch them for you for free. Have you ever eaten anything straight out of the ocean or sea? πŸ™‚

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16 Comments Add yours

  1. Great photos and interesting post. I had sea urchin a few years ago and love it, but it’s not so easy to get here. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Thank you Ronit. Same here. Ar the Same time, it’s not the same unless it’s straight from the source, but it’s one of those things to look forward to when travelling. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Jess T. says:

    I ate fish from a lake when I went camping because a fisherman spotted my family and gave us some of his catch, but we did grill it first. I’ve also had sushi in the past but it’s always been crab or something else that was cooked. I think the only raw thing I’ve had from the ocean are mussels and they were delicious!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Have you tried oysters? Those can be pretty good too. Thanks for stopping by Jess. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jess T. says:

        If I did, it was sooo long ago!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. That’s quite a fish market – no thanks to sea urchins!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. annika says:

    So interesting and lovely photos… can’t say I could do this though!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Just close your eyes and gulp πŸ˜‰ Thanks Annika!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Loved this post, Rini. I can’t claim to have eaten anything straight from the sea but I’ve cooked with seafood that’s not long been out of the sea. I’ve never actually tried sea urchin but I’m desperate to because I love everything that comes from the sea. It’s on the list of “must do” things.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Thanks Tracey. I hope all is well with you.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. cookingflip says:

    Oysters. Though I shivered after quickly gulping them down (cold and slimy!). Won’t try again, lol. But I love the Filipino “kinilaw”–raw fish cubes (especially the malasugi variety/species) in sugar cane or coconut vinegar, and coconut milk, with onions, green chili, ginger and some citrus.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rini says:

      Ahhh, I looked that up and it’s like a ceviche. I love ceviche, so I’ll have to see if I can find kinilaw around these parts…or just go to the Philippines…directly to the source. Lol.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. cookingflip says:

        Of course πŸ™‚ The best I’ve tasted were in the south (you’ll have to fly from Manila), especially those from Surigao. There are beaches where I see plenty of sea urchins too, but not sure if the locals know they can be eaten. (Btw, I saw your sisig in Insta–yum! πŸ˜‹ I don’t have Insta yet, so can’t connect, lol.) Enjoy your weekend, Rini β˜€

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Rini says:

        I’m not that great when it comes to Insta. I have no idea what I am doing there. Lol Have a lovely (hopefully sunny) weekend!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. cookingflip says:

        πŸ˜„β˜€

        Liked by 1 person

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